La Jolla Underwater Park • Oct 11 Log


 Video Clips


Time Weather Ocean
7:15 AM 48°, Sun 69°
Vis. Surf Tide
5-10′ ≤ 2′ Low +2.4
@ 6:14
3 Divers • 11 Species Observed

Inshore Fishes Survey (Reef.org Format)

  • Single • Few (2-10) • Many (11-100) • Abundant
  • |Solo • Pairs • Groups (3-5) • Schools (≥6)
Fish Family Species | ID Photo Links Numbers | Groupings
*** *** ***
Damselfish Garibaldi (adults, larger juveniles) M | solo, groups
Damselfish Blacksmith
Wrasse CA Sheephead (Male) S
Wrasse Rock Wrasse M | solo, groups
Wrasse Señorita
Sea Chub Opaleye M | schools
Sea Chub Zebra Perch M | schools
Sea Chub Halfmoon
Surfperch 18 CA marine species:
Rainbow Perch
Rubberlipped Seaperch
Striped Seaperch
Kelp Perch
Pile Perch
***




Round Stingray Round Ray
Rhinobatidae Shovelnose Guitarfish ^ (up to 5′) F | solo
Rhinobatidae Banded Guitarfish^ (up to 3′)
Rhinobatidae Bat Ray
Rajidae Thornback Ray
Sea Bass Kelp Bass  lots of larger juveniles M | solo, groups
Sea Bass Barred Sand Bass
Grunt Sargo ^ F |solo
Grunt Salema??|  (big eye bass, striped bass)
Silverside Topsmelt M | schools
Houndshark Soupfin Shark
Houndshark Leopard Shark M
Bullhead Shark Horn Shark S
Tube/ Kelp Blenny Giant Kelpfish 0
Drum/Croaker CA Corbina (Shortfin?) F | pair
  • ^Not on Reef.org primary species list
  • Note: left Goby, Greenling, Sculpin, & Scorpionfish families off table since rarely seen in shallow waters of the La Jolla Underwater park (except at night, one of our divers reports)

NexGen Slideshow (Jetpack dznt work w/ Sela Theme… so change Theme)

Resources for Identifying Fishes ….

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La Jolla Underwater Park • Sept 17 Log


Time Weather Ocean
7:25 AM 67°, Clouds 68°
Vis. Surf Tide
10-15′ ≤ 2′ High +1.4
@ 8:24
3 Divers • 12 Species Observed
are we supposed to add Latitude and Longitude
check the Reef.org site

Video Clips


Inshore Fishes Survey (Reef.org Format)

  • Single • Few (2-10) • Many (11-100) • Abundant
  • Solo • Pairs • Groups (3-5) • Schools (≥6)
Fish Family Species | ID Photo Links Numbers | Groupings
*** *** ***
Damselfish Garibaldi (adults) F | solo
Damselfish Blacksmith
Wrasse CA  Sheephead (female)
eating Bryozoa?
F | pair
Wrasse Rock Wrasse (male)
sucker lips extended (cleaners)
black spot behind pectoral
F | solo
Wrasse Señorita
Sea Chub Opaleye F | small groups
Sea Chub Zebra Perch F | pair
Sea Chub Halfmoon
Surfperch 18 CA marine species:
Rainbow Perch
Rubberlipped Seaperch
Striped Seaperch
Kelp Perch
Pile Perch
***




Round Stingray Round Ray S^
Rhinobatidae Shovelnose Guitarfish ^ (up to 5′)
Rhinobatidae Banded Guitarfish^ (up to 3′)
Rhinobatidae Bat Ray
Rajidae Thornback Ray
Sea Bass Kelp Bass congregation*
Video: Schooling Kelp Bass
Video: Agressive Kelp Bass
Many!
Sea Bass Barred Sand Bass
Grunt Sargo ^ (note hump in back
vs Zebraperch)
 S| solo
Grunt Salema?^|  (big eye bass, striped bass) M | school
Silverside Topsmelt A | schools
Houndshark Soupfin Shark (aka Tope) S
Houndshark Leopard Shark
Bullhead Shark Horn Shark
Tube/ Kelp Blenny Giant Kelpfish (no pic) S
Drum/Croaker CA Corbina (Shortfin?)
  • ^Not on Reef.org primary species list
  • Note: left Goby, Greenling, Sculpin, & Scorpionfish families off table since rarely seen in shallow waters of the La Jolla Underwater park (except at night, one of our divers reports)

For Gallery-Slideshow and Resources for Identifying Fishes

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Test of (Jetpack) Gallery for Reef.org Survey

Gallery is better choice for Surveys than Slideshow [BUT only with a THEME that supports Jetpack Slideshow–this theme, SELA, does NOT] because: click on it and it turns into a slide show and shows pic titles with Family|Species captions


Still need to ID slides #9 and #10 –these are not the same fish!) candidates: Zebraperch; Barred Perch

Test NextGen Slideshow-for Reef.org Surveys

NOTE these examples (slideshow, gallery, image browser) are all LEGACY NextGen templates–why? do I need to get PRO? or change to a theme that supports Jetpack slideshows?

NextGen Slideshow: arrows on, pause on cursor off… but no image names! and if I enlarge does it jump to small in between each enlarged slide? it was doing that–but it stopped now–I turned off “fade” in transition


NextGen Gallery

****


 

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Traditional Classification vs Phylogenetic (using Fish as an Example)

Traditional classification

Traditional spindle diagram of the evolution of the vertebrates at CLASS level

Conventional classification has living vertebrates grouped into seven CLASSES based on traditional interpretations of gross anatomical and physiological traits. This classification is the one most commonly encountered in school textbooks, overviews, non-specialist, and popular works. The extant vertebrates are:

  • Subphylum Vertebrata: 7 Classes (often taught as 5 Vertebrate Classes, by collapsing the 3 fish classes into one)

In addition to these, there are two classes of extinct armoured fishes, the Placodermi and the Acanthodii, both of which are considered paraphyletic.


Add Info on Phylogenetic (using Fish as an Example)

 

Reduction in Phytoplankton-40% since 1950s

It may be hardest of all to care about something unseen. A single glass of seawater drawn from the surf in Newport or Brookings might look clear but in fact would roil with at least 75 million organisms called phytoplankton.

And we vitally depend upon such creatures. Out in the ocean, infinite numbers of them produce half the world’s oxygen and form the base of the marine food chain. For what it’s worth, phytoplankton eat crazy amounts of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas.

But their numbers are down 40 percent worldwide since the 1950s and may be headed down further. The culprit appears to be rising ocean temperatures associated with climate change. The sea’s warming top layer of water, where phytoplankton do their job, increasingly lacks life-sustaining nutrients from the cold deep.

via An ocean on the slide could hurt us badly | OregonLive.com.

Robot Project-Challenge 2: Hit the Bull’s Eye! • 1999-2002 Shanghai School District; Santa Fe, USA

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSTr5x3EMUk]

Teach Roamer to Hit the Bull’s Eye!

Kimiko and Sage, age six, learn about DISTANCE and DIRECTION by playing robot darts.

After each attempt they mark their Roamer robot’s place and correct their program (or their aim). On the 3rd try their robot puts a mark in the bull’s eye!

Solution: CM CM ^8 steps GO!

Key: CM = Clear Memory; ^ = Forward; 8 = Number of Roamer Steps; Go = Execute!


Math Skills & Concepts in Challenge 1.2: Estimation (distance, direction); Units (Roamer-steps); Number Sense (magnitude, sequence); and more….

Problem-Solving Skills & Concepts: Active Learning (children are problem-solvers, teacher is coach); Scientific Method (write guess; test & learn from results); Building-Block Method (build upon concepts learned in Challenge 1.1); and more….

Programming Skills & Concepts: Commands (actions & symbols); Syntax Lesson 1 (Word Order)



Math & Science Olympics!

• Let’s Get Our Kids in the Game!

Robot Project-Challenge 3: Round the World • 1999-2002 Shanghai School District; Santa Fe, USA

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JzgPeSlJ3h4]

Teach Roamer to Knock Over the Pegs!

Vivi, Lilly, and Meredith, ages six, six, and seven, learn about CIRCLES and DEGREES by trial and error. After a 1st guess of 5° they arrive, on their 5th trial, at 360° (by chance!) and solve the problem: Teach Roamer™ to Knock Over the Circle of Pegs!

Solution: CM CM –>360° GO!


Math Skills & Concepts in Challenge 1.3: Geometry (circle); Estimation (arc); Units (degrees); Number Sense (magnitude, sequence); and more….

Problem-Solving Skills & Concepts: Active Learning (children are problem-solvers, teacher is coach); Scientific Method (write guess, test & learn from results); Simulation (put yourself in Roamer’s ‘shoes’)

Programming Skills & Concepts: Intro to “Turn” Command (action & symbol: –> = turn right);
Syntax Lesson 1 (Word Order)

Math & Science Olympics!
• Let’s Get Our Kids in the Game!

Robot Project-Challenge No. 4 • 1999-2002 Shanghai School District; Santa Fe, USA

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUKDTfax_iM]

Park Roamer in the Garage!

Jon & Dave, age six, explore RIGHT ANGLES as they take on the 4th Challenge: Teach Roamer™ to go down the maze and into the garage (without hitting the bricks!). On their 5th try, they find that 88° solves the problem.

Solution: CM CM ^6 steps –>88° ^2 steps GO!


Math Skills & Concepts in Challenge 1.4: Right Angles; Estimation (distance, arc); Units (Roamer-steps, degrees); and more….

Problem-Solving Skills & Concepts: 3-Step Problem (challenges get more complex as children progress); Active Learning (children are problem-solvers, teacher is coach); Scientific Method (write guess, test & learn from results); Building-Block Method (build upon concepts learned in early Challenges); Simulation (put yourself in Roamer’s ‘shoes’); and more….

Programming Skills & Concepts: Syntax Lessons 1 (Word Order) & 2 (Chains of Commands)

Math & Science Olympics!
• Let’s Get Our Kids in the Game!

21st Century “Mind Tools”: Pedagogical Advantages of Programmable Robots

Image14 * Probot Racer Robot

“Programmable robots  can serve as the basis of a powerful problem-solving curriculum that will help young children develop the habit of creative, independent problem-solving while introducing them to the key technologies of the modern Information Age.”

  • add LINK: Not all robots are created equal: See “How to Choose the Right Robot” (or, “How to Tell If Your Robotics program is bogus”)

roamer-i-keyboard_robot

update this to match the latest pdf, 2017 Pedagogical Advantages of Programmable Robots-it’s not about the (specific) robot. © 2003-2021 TE Donahue

The Pedagogical Advantages of Programmable Robots

  • Programmable Robots-on-wheels encourage children to work with their hands and their minds to move through and manipulate their environment.

“The hand is the instrument of the intellect.” — Maria Montessori

As With All Well-designed Manipulatives:

  • Programmable Robots provide a medium through which to explore the world.
  • Programmable Robots allow for meaningful play (closely related to creativity): play that reveals to children the secrets of their environment.
  • Programmable Robots provide a material path to abstraction: i.e., a material, or concrete, way for children to model abstract concepts like length, angle, or negative vs. positive numbers.

Unlike Inert, Passive, Show-&-Tell Manipulatives:
(And many electronic games, toys, and computer “educational” software)

  • Programmable Robots are multi-use: exploration, modeling, and problem-solving tools.
  • Programmable Robots are not limited to rigid or prescribed (pre-programmed) uses or behaviors: children can explore their environment creatively, testing and refining their concepts of it as they go.
  • Programmable Robots allow children to think creatively about the solutions to a large variety of inherently interesting problems, and to easily and immediately test their possible solutions.
  • The Robot’s behaviors are transparent, not mysterious like the “black boxes” (software games driven by invisible code, electronic devices with invisible pre-programmed circuits) that children are handed to play with or “learn” from but which they do not understand. A Programmable Robot’s behaviors are the direct result of the children’s actions.

“Whatever I cannot recreate for myself I do not understand.”
— Richard Feynmann, Nobel Laureate in Physics

Dramatic & Interactive • Early Learning Advantage • Gets Kids “In the Game”
Programmable Robots get all children writing code and seeing computers as tools, not toys or entertainment devices.

  • Children can identify with their Robots, anthropomorphizing them and putting themselves in their robot’s “shoes” to visualize movement in space: a powerful problem solving technique.
  • This dramatic aspect of the Robots makes possible another powerful learning tool: the idea of the Robot as the children’s student. Children learn by “teaching” their Robot to solve Project-Challenges.

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What is Roamer Robot?

roamer-i-keyboard_robot

The foundation of Kinder I.T.! Level 1 is Roamer™, a programmable robot on wheels who will become your child’s “student.” Your child, working with his or her group mates, will learn to “speak” Roamer’s simple but powerful programming language, then “teach” his or her Roamer to solve a series of problems from mathematics, science, geography, art, and many other subject areas.

Unlike the PC computer, the Roamer robot demands that children become active programmers—without their input the Roamer simply will not  move!  Its keyboard and language are simple enough for very young children to begin actively exploring Information Technology, yet powerful enough to grow as your child does. Here’s what your kids and Roamer will do together: Continue reading

Project Tree 1.1: Problem-Solving Tools

Use these Creative Learning tools to help your Robot beat the Project-Challenges!

Creativity is the “Problem-Solving Habit”!

Project Tree 1-1_TOOLS

Rulers: use the ruler here: |————-| to measure this diagram and find out how many Roamer steps it would take to get to the garage.

Protractors: use the protractor to find out: how many degrees in one circle? If Roamer turns ¼ of the way around a circle, how many degrees would he or she have turned?

Dry-Erase Drawing Boards & Roamer Pens: Drawing boards help you keep track of and quickly change your guesses; Roamer pens help you trace Roamers path so you can see what corrections you need to make when your first guess doesn’t work.

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Two Improvements to Math & Science Robotics Materials

** I’ve been trying out a new tool with the Kindergarten robotics class: magnetic programming symbols so

  • (a) they don’t have to worry about writing out the symbols when they create programs and
  • (b) they can keep their programs and give them names (“bring coffee to teacher”) etc. Working very well so far… (remember Lego study: if kids can keep their projects–rather than disassembling them after each session–they become addicted to building. If they have to destroy their work after each session, not much interest. Same for science and math: let kids KEEP their projects and they look forward to each new learning period)

1. Magnetic programming symbols: a new tool for kids to use with the Roamers– I pasted the programming symbols onto magnets and got a large metal dry erase board so that:

  • (a) younger children don’t have to worry about writing symbols when they “talk to their robot” (writing at this age just gets in the way of the thinking, but the magnets seem to remove that problem completely) and
  • (b) they can keep their programs and give them names (“bring coffee to mom”) etc. which allows them to put together a book of Roamer Jobs/Programs.

2. Put together a “tool box” (with a handle!) for children to carry their Roamer/Math & Science Olympics tools around with them from one Olympic Event to another. They love having and carrying tools.

22 West Coast Species of Surfperches • Status from 1920s to 2003 • CAWildlife.gov


PDF: 2003 Report on Status of 18  Local Species of CA Surfperches

whereas the drop in landings from 1983 to 2001 appears to be due to declines in surfperch populations.


Overview of the Fishery

13. SURFPERCHES

The 22 species in the surfperch family, Embiotocidae, are commonly called surfperch, seaperch and perch. They are found predominantly in temperate, northeastern Pacific waters; however, three species are found in the Sea of Japan and one species (tule perch, Hysterocarpus traski) occupies freshwater and estuarine habitats in California.

Eighteen species occur in California’s coastal waters:

  1. barred surfperch Amphistichus argenteus
  2. black perch Embiotoca jacksoni
  3. calico surfperch Amphistichus koelzi
  4. dwarf perch Micrometrus minimus
  5. kelp perch Brachyistius frenatus
  6. pile perch Rhacochilus vacca
  7. pink seaperch Zalembius rosaceus
  8. rainbow seaperch Hypsurus caryi
  9. redtail surfperch Amphistichus rhodoterus
  10. reef perch Micrometrus aurora
  11. rubberlip seaperch Rhacochilus toxotes
  12. sharpnose seaperch Phanerodon atripes
  13. shiner perch Cymatogaster aggregate
  14. silver surfperch Hyperprosopon ellipticum
  15. spotfin surfperch Hyperprosopon anale
  16. striped seaperch Embiotoca lateralis
  17. walleye surfperch Hyperprosopon argenteum
  18. white seaperch Phanerodon furcataus

  • one Estuary|Freshwater CA perch
  • 3 from Sea of Japan
  • 3 from Sea of Japan
  • 3 from Sea of Japan

The island surfperch, Cymatogaster gracilis, was once thought to be a separate species, however it is now considered synonymous with shiner perch.

 
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